Information Services @ Sno-Isle

The spot where information about information lives

October Top Ten GVRL Titles

Knots 2012
Favorite Knots for the Sports Enthusiast 2008
Malaria 2010
The Rough Guide to Fiji, 2nd ed.
Eyewitness Top 10 Travel Guide: Vancouver & Victoria, 2014
Motorcycle 2012
The Health Care System e2013 2013
Eyewitness Top 10 Travel Guide: Paris, 2014
Norway 2012
Perspectives on Modern World History: The Brown v. Board of Education Trial
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Finding obituaries might be easier in the future

FamilySearch and GenealogyBank have announced a joint effort to make over a billion records from historical obituaries searchable online. It will be the largest—and perhaps most significant—online US historic records access initiative yet. It will take tens of thousands of online volunteers to make GenealogyBank’s vast U.S. obituary collection more discoverable online.

I’ll keep an eye on this and let you know as soon as they start publishing!

Top Ten GVRL Titles in July

Cultural Encyclopedia of Vegetarianism 2010
The Rough Guide to Portugal, 14th ed.
Sydney 2011
How to Write Persuasively Today 2010
The Value of a Dollar e4 2009
Novels for Students, vol. 11
Business Plans Handbook, vol. 36
Kenya 2013
St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture, 2nd ed., vol. 1
The Rough Guide to Classical Music e5 2010

And that Cultural Encyclopedia of Vegetarianism had over 330 full text retrievals!

ArchiveGrid

ArchiveGrid?  Never heard of this?  Well, neither had I until I stumbled on a blog post extolling its virtues.  Here’s their description of this service:

ArchiveGrid includes over 5 million records describing archival materials, bringing together information about historical documents, personal papers, family histories, and more. With over 1,000 different archival institutions represented, ArchiveGrid helps researchers looking for primary source materials held in archives, libraries, museums and historical societies.

 

You can browse by state with the map on the home page or through the drop-down menu below.   For example, when I looked at the Washington State Library, I found this:

Very useful for our genealogy and local history researchers!

Changes in the loan of LDS microfilm

Effective September 1, 2017 the LDS Family History Center will no longer loan microfilm to its affiliates (SNO is an affiliate).   The supply of unexposed microfilm and duplication equipment has forced them to make this decision.  For more details about the reasons, please see their website.

But on the upside, there are some amazing digitization efforts going on and you will see that content on FamilySearch.org.  For more information about the decision and the implications, please check the FAQ on the FamilySearch.org website.

Top Ten GVRL Titles in May

Prohibition and Death were hot topics!

Prohibition 2013
Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion 2010
American History: The Salem Witch Trials
Transforming the Screen, 1950-1959 2003
Macmillan Encyclopedia of Death and Dying, vol. 2
Business Plans Handbook, vol. 36
Test and Assess Your IQ 2008
Gems 2013
Macmillan Encyclopedia of Death and Dying, vol. 1
American History: Prohibition

Sanborn Maps Online!

From Genealogy Gems:

Breaking news! The Library of Congress has put online nearly 25,000 additional Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps–and more are coming! Over the next three years, more will be added monthly until all 50 states are covered from the 1880s through the 1960s.

Sanborn maps show detailed information about neighborhoods, buildings, roads and more for thousands of towns in the U.S. and beyond. A sizable collection of pre-1900 Sanborn maps are already online at the Library of Congress (use the above link).

Consumer Complaints Database of Contacts

I recently helped a family member whose Uber account had been hacked.  He couldn’t get Uber to do anything when he used the “contact us” link on their website.  Fortunately, I was able to show him Elliott.org and its database of over 500 companies with links to names and addresses (real and email) of executives.  This list is maintained by Christopher Elliott and his crew–he’s a well-known consumer advocate and journalist.

Long story made short–within 2 hours of sending an email to a Vice-President at Uber, my relative had everything straightened out.

New resource for genealogists searching for holocaust information

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum has made the first two volumes of their Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos 1933-1945 freely available on its website at
https://www.ushmm.org/research/publications/encyclopedia-camps-ghettos/volumes-i-and-ii-available-online.

Volume I includes the major concentration camps, their sub-camps, SS
construction brigades, and early camps set up by the police, SA and SS
shortly after the Nazis seized power.  Volume II includes ghettos in
German-occupied territories.  Each volume matches the physical format
of the book, and each consists of two pdf files.  The place name index
is in the back of the second part of each volume.  Each signed article
includes citations and bibliographies for further research.  Overview
articles provide additional information, and are worth reading.

Future volumes will be made available online after the print volume
has been available for a few years.  Volume III- camps and ghettos in
countries allied with the Nazis- is scheduled to be released in print
this year.

The volume II will be helpful to any patrons researching their Jewish ancestors and volume I will be helpful for the families of American soldiers who help liberate the camps.

 

From:

Megan Lewis, reference librarian

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

Changes at the Washington State Library

These all happen on February 1, 2017.  So if you’re recommending a trip to WSL, be aware that things will be different.

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